Introducing WordPress via Articulate Replay

Looking for a blog, cloud-based software and hosting solution for yourself, your company, organization or association?  WordPress may just be what you’re looking for.  This short demonstration should provide you with a good overview of the anatomy of a WordPress site, using the “Enterprise” theme.

At the same time, you’ll see the results of using Articulate Replay to record screencasts and leverage them individually or embed them into your Articulate Studio or Storyline projects.

Contact me via eMail with any questions.

Quizzing Examples from TechSmith Camtasia Studio

Just a short demonstration of quizzing capabilities with TechSmith Camtasia Studio.

NOTE: The quiz at the end of this video (hosted here within WordPress) will not be available.  Click here to access the complete Flash / HTML5 version of this demonstration.

Contact me with any questions.

Daylight Saving Time Around the World

The United States switches to daylight savings time on the 9th of March.  Europe switches on the 30th of March which means that during these three weeks, the difference in time from Europe to the United States will be one hour less (e.g. 5 hours difference between Paris and New York instead of 6).

Further country details available from the Daylight Saving Time site.

Stéfan / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-SA

Kennst Du Frankfurt am Main?

Warst Du schon einmal in Frankfurt am Main?  Lebst Du hier schon lange?  Kennst Du Dich gut aus?  Hiermit kannst Du Deine Kenntnisse testen.  Eingesetzte Autorensoftware: Articulate Engage (Bilderzoom).

Articulate Engage - Kennst Du Frankfurt am Main?

Kontaktiere mich mit Fragen.

The Early History of Cache Valley

Listen to a short story about “The Early History of Cache Valley”, written by the Cache Valley Visitors Bureau and narrated by Jason Howard Peterson with photos from past vacations in and around Logan, Utah – USA.  Software used for this: Audacity and TechSmith’s Camtasia Studio.

Alternatively, you can simply access the following .WAV file and listen to the voice narration.


Contact me via eMail with any questions.

Working with Percentages

You know the saying: “use it or lose it”, don’t you?  Well, I am no different.  Years ago when I focused on back-office management accounting, I was constantly 10-keying all sorts of numbers up and down, in and out, into and out of sheets, systems and tools (yeah, I loved it).  What drives me up the wall today, each and every time is when I am stumped with a simple question working with percentages – so this blog will serve as my “cheat sheet” I will refer to going forward and I hope it’s helpful for others too.

Since I am from / live in Germany, I will use a comma instead of a decimal as do the majority of countries, when separating between €uros and €uro Cents.  Access “Countries Using a Comma” for further details.  We’ll also be using value added tax (VAT) in some of our calculations.  Calculator entries are highlighted in red.  So, let’s begin!

Calculate the net from the gross price of €uro 148,20 and the gross from the net (19% VAT)

  • 148,20 / 1,19 = 124,5378 (€uro 124,54)
  • 124,54 * 1,19 = 148,2026 (€uro 148,20)

Calculate the net from the gross price of €uro 148,20 and the gross from the net (7% VAT)

  • 148,20 / 1,07 = 138,5046 (€uro 138,50)
  • 138,50 * 1,07 = 148,195 (€uro 148,20)

Calculate 19% and 7% VAT from the gross price of €uro 148,20

  • 148,20 / 119 * 19 = €uro 23,66
  • 148,20 / 107 * 7 = €uro 9,70

Calculate 19% VAT to add on top of the net price of €uro 124,54

  • 124,54 * 0,19 = €uro 23,66

Calculate 7% VAT to add on top of the net price of €uro 138,50

  • 138,50 * 0,07 = €uro 9,70

You sell your professional services for €uro 120 per hour plus 19% VAT

  • 120 + (19% of 120) = 120 + (0,19 x 120) = €uro 142,80
  • 120 * (100% + 19%) = 120 * (1,00 + 0,19) – OR – 120 * 1,19 = €uro 142,80

You quote your total, hourly price of €uro 142,80 to the client including 19% VAT (gross); how does one calculate the price before VAT?

  • The gross amount (100% + 19%) = 119% or 1,19 – divide the gross amount of €uro 142,80 / by 1,19 which equals your net amount of €uro 120,00 (142,80 / 1,19 = 120)

You need to change percentages into decimals in order to work with them for other calculations?

  • 45% (45 / 100 = 0,45)
  • 7% (7 / 100 = 0,07)

You need to change decimals to percentages?

  • 0,45 * 100 = 45%
  • 0,07 * 100 = 7%

You need to convert fractions to percentages; changing fractions to decimals?

  • 4/5 = 0,80 = 80% (4 / 5 *100 = 80%)
  • 3/4 = 0,75 = 75% (3 / 4 * 100 = 75%)

Within your family of two parents and eight children, each have their own nicknames – you were responsible for designing nine of those nicknames.  What percent of those nine were created by you?

  • 13 = 100%
  • 9 = 69% (9 / 13 = 0,6923)

Your gross pay per month during the year of 1991 was 2.346,80 – your gross pay per month during the year of 1992 was 3.608,29; what percentage increase / change did you experience from 1991 to 1992?

  • Calculate the difference between the two amounts (3608,29 – 2346,80 = 1261,49)
  • Make a fraction of the difference over the first of the two amounts (1261,49 / 2346,80 = 0,5375)
  • Convert the fraction to a percentage by dividing the denominator into 100 times the numerator (126149 / 2346,80 = 53,75%)
  • Your gross salary increase from 1991 to 1992 equals 53,75%

As a real-estate agent, you mediate the sale of a small condominium for €uro 92.000,00 and collect commission (including 19% VAT) of 5,95% – calculate the gross and net commission and clarify the 5,95% commission to your buyer.

  • Gross commission the buyer pays you = €uro 5.474,00 (92000 * 0,0595 = 5474)
  • Your net commission = €uro 4.600,00 (5474 / 1,19 = 4600)
  • 92000 * 0,05 = €uro 4.600,00 (your net commission)
  • 92000 * 0,0095 = €uro 874,00 (the 19% VAT you collect from the buyer and submit to your local tax authorities)
  • Your explanation to the buyer for the 5,95% gross commission is that you expect 5% net commission from the selling price of €uro 92.000,00 and the additional 0,95% includes the 19% VAT required for each percentage point of commission (5 * 0,19 = 0,95%)

Your real-estate agent requires 5,95% commission if your object is sold through his rendered services and 2,38% if you rent an apartment or house from him; why 5,95% and 2,38%?  What do these percentages mean?

  • Sale with 5,95% commission – 5% = the net commission with 19% VAT on top (0,19 * 5 = 0,95)
  • Rental with 2,38% commission – 2% = the net commission with 19% VAT on top (0,19 * 2 = 0,38)
  • The real-estate agent includes 19% VAT (that he submits to his local tax authorities) in the total percentage of commission provided – like the gross amount you would note or rather pay on any other purchase of goods and services (excluding food and books)

As a real-estate agent, you work for a franchise-based real-estate broker.  The franchise requires the broker to pay 9% for all transactions of its agents and the broker requires you to give 20% of your commission to the brokerage, leaving you with 80% of the end-brokerage commission.  How do you calculate your gross commission that you end-up banking for a rental apartment you mediated for €uro 625,00 monthly rent (w/o utilities) if the regulated commission from your region is 2 times monthly rent?  How do you calculate the overall percentage of commission you would end-up receiving from the initial transaction?  For this calculation, focus on net commission only, without local VAT.

  • Monthly rent w/o utilities €uro 625,00 * 2 = €uro 1.250,00 less 9% franchise fee of 112,50 (1250 / 100 * 9 = 112,50) = €uro 1.137,50
  • From the brokerage commission of €uro 1.137,50 you bank 80% (1137,50 * 0,80 = 910,00), leaving 20% (1137,50 * 0,20 = 227,50) for your broker
  • Considering your banked amount of €uro 910,00, you take home ca. 73% of the original commission (910 / 1250 = 0,728)

Working with Percentages

Contact me with any questions.

Frequent Bullet Point Issues

Have you ever had bullet point stress with Microsoft PowerPoint and couldn’t fix things with the Ruler?  You’re not alone.  I don’t think I have ever had bullet point issues anywhere else but in and with some PowerPoint files I have either created myself or have received from customers to adjust.

Many (including myself) have tried to futz around with these issues by activating the Ruler and adjusting from there – I have found that using Paragraph (Indents and Spacing) is much more effective, without paying any attention (or little) to the Ruler.

One of the most common issues I am approached with is when the extended, typed text from one bullet point doesn’t “wrap-around” as expected, beginning directly underneath the first letter / word at the beginning of the bullet point’s content; like this example.

MS-PowerPoint: Frequent Bullet Point Issues (A)

Some users may choose to activate / display the Ruler and start “moving things around”, only making matters worse.  What one should do is to open Paragraph and adjust Indents and Spacing; compare other bullet points from the same slide and you’ll most likely identify the needed change.

MS-PowerPoint: Frequent Bullet Point Issues (B)

From this specific issue, especially comparing this bullet point with other bullet points, we quickly see that the Indentation before the text has been adjusted at one point in time to zero; we just need to ensure that 0,64 cm is added to the Before field setting as it is seen within the By field.

MS-PowerPoint: Frequent Bullet Point Issues (C)

TIP: Use the keyboard functionality of Shift+Alt+–> or <– to adjust the indentation level of bullet points.

I will add to this job aid in the future as I stumble over other issues; in the meantime, please reach out to us with any questions.

Download "Frequent Bullet Point Issues"

Quickly change the case of text

Looking for quick solutions to change (en masse) the case of text from an Excel, Word or PowerPoint file?  Often, when data crunching or exporting / importing data from systems and colleagues at work, you may find it helpful to be able to change a large amount of data originally provided in lower case, upper case or mixed case to its proper case or change lower to upper and upper to lower.

With Microsoft Excel, if your data has been provided to you in one column completely in upper or lower case and you’d like to change the content of all cells (rows) from that specific column, then apply the following, simple function in a new column (e.g. to the right-hand side) followed by copying this applied function to other cells below:

  • =LOWER(A1) changes all text to lower case
  • =UPPER(A9) changes all text to upper case
  • =PROPER(A3) changes all to proper case

MS-Office: Quickly change the case of text (A)

Are you using Excel 2013 already?  If so, check out the capabilities with “Flash Fill” under Data Tools.  With the same data above and in a new column to the right, type out manually how the changed case of the text to the left should appear in that new column’s cell e.g. “Peterson, Diane” (proper case) and confirm with Enter…then, choose Ctrl+E or Flash Fill from Data Tools and the rest of the column’s content will be updated.

MS-Office: Quickly change the case of text (B)

Changing the case of text via Word or PowerPoint is even easier.  Highlight the text and select your desired changes from the Change Case icon under Font – alternatively, select the text and choose Shift+F3 until the desired case change is complete.

MS-Office: Quickly change the case of text (C)

In addition to the above, access “Change the case of text” (applies to Excel 2007), “Change the case of text” (applies to Excel 2013) and “Change the capitalization of text” (applies to Word and PowerPoint) for additional help and/or further details.

Please contact us with any questions.

Download "Quickly change the case of text"

Creative Communications

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Californian turned Bostonian. Studying publishing, savoring food & rediscovering travel.

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PhD in Cognitive Psychology - Expert in UX assessment

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The latest news on WordPress.com and the WordPress community.

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